Latest News

2016 IPC Asia Oceania Athletics Championship: T34 Preview

This file is ineligible for copyright and therefore in the public domain because it consists entirely of information that is common property and contains no original authorship.

The T34 class is for wheelchair users who have minimal limitations or control problems in their arms and trunk while pushing a wheelchair. This group tends to be on the cusp, with lower functional classes like T31, T32, and T33 generally not being as represented in adaptive athletics because it tends to attract fewer competitors than other sports like swimming, boccia, and wheelchair rugby. The lack of competitors in this class is on display with the number of events for this class at the 2016 IPC Asia Oceania Athletics Championship, with only the 100 meters on the program for women, and only the 100, 200, 400 and 800 meters on the program for men.

Name Date Event Terrain Class Age Grade Pace (mile) Time
No results to display
Name Date Event Terrain Class Age Grade Pace (mile) Time
No results to display
`

Australian women have been active in this class this year, though either they were not making their way to other states to compete in state competitions or they did not have options at home. 2015 ended with 17 women ranked in this event. Great Britain’s Hannah Cockroft had the best time last season at 0:17.36. Little’s best time last season was 0:18.34, and she’s been very close to that in 2016. With Great Britain not competing in this event, Little should easily take home a first place and could beat last year’s best. Her major competition is likely to be Japan’s Haruka Kitaura, who posted a season best time last year of 0:19.78. Japan’s Niina Kochi had a best time of 0:25.22, well off the pace of Little. If Australia brings Lambird and Preketes, they could get a second podium spot as all three have times better than Kochi.
The men’s T34 has more depth, with 28 men finishing 2015 with a ranking. Tunisia’s Walid Ktila was ranked first with a time of 0:14.95. The United Arab Emirates’ Mohamed Hammadi was the third ranked competitor in this class in 2015 with a time of 0:15.49, a hundredth of a second faster than Australia’s Rheed McCracken. Rheed’s time this year is within spitting distance of that time. The duo should make this race highly interesting and highly competitive assuming both enter in good form. The next best regional competitor is Qatar’s Mohammed Rashid A J Al-Kubaisi, who had a best time of 0:16.83. It is close but may not be close enough to pose a real threat to Hammadi and McCracken.

Name Date Event Terrain Class Age Grade Pace (mile) Time
No results to display

Hammadi is the top ranked Asian and Oceania competitor in the 200 meter. He had a 2015 season best time of 0:27.03 , way better than the only Australian time for this event this year. McCracken does not appear to have competed domestically in the major South Australian, Queensland or Victorian races and posted a time. His season best last year was 0:29.35. There were no other Asian and Oceania competitors between them. Like the 100 meters, Qatar’s Al-Kubaisi is the third ranked regional competitor in this event based on 2015 results. He had a best time of 0:31.38. This race should be relatively boring in the sense that the results should be reasonably predictable, with the real question of can they better their own times from last season?

Name Date Event Terrain Class Age Grade Pace (mile) Time
No results to display

The 2015 season finished with 25 ranked competitors. The regional rankings are a repeat of the two previous classes. Hammadi’s best time was 0:51.94. McCracken ‘s best time was 0:52.80, much faster than the time he put up almost exactly a month ago in Canberra of 0:55.22. Qatar’s Al-Kubaisi had a season best time of 0:58.03.

Name Date Event Terrain Class Age Grade Pace (mile) Time
No results to display

The Australian men do not appear to have been active in this event, while the Australian women who do not have the ability to race in this one have been. Little’s form is not as good as it was in 2015 though. Back to the men. The rankings based on 2015 are flipped, with McCracken ranked first in Asia/Oceania with a best time of 1:45.27. Hammadi was super close, with a season best time of 1:45.36. If both are in form, there could be a serious competition for first. Al-Kubaisi is in the third spot again based on 2015 rankings, with a season best time of 1:58.84. He poses no serious threat to McCracken and Hammadi.

 
Based on the available races, the men’s competition should be a two person battle for first place. The women’s race also has the potential to be competitive, depending on Little’s form.

Laura Hale
About Laura Hale (2521 Articles)
Laura Hale is a sport journalist, specializing in Paralympic and disability sport news. Prior to helping found ParaSport-News, she spent two and a half years working as a journalist on Wikinews, a citizen journalism site. As a journalist, she has covered the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London, the 2013 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships in La Molina, the 2014 Winter Paralympics in Sochi, and a number of other sporting events. She has additional experience with Paralympic sport having worked as a Wikipedian in Residence for the Australian and Spanish Paralympic Committees.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*


%d bloggers like this: